Waiting On Wednesday: ‘Deadman’s Track’ by Sarah Barrie

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly event hosted at Breaking the Spine. The purpose is to spotlight upcoming releases that we are excited for.

 

Published by:

Expected Publication: 8th July 2020

Waiting On Wednesday: ‘Something to Talk About’ by Rachael Johns

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly event hosted at Breaking the Spine. The purpose is to spotlight upcoming releases that we are excited for.

 

Published by: Harlequin Australia

Expected Publication: 20th April 2020

It’s the opposite of love at first sight…or is it?

Dairy farmer Tabitha Cooper-Jones has a heart of gold, yet she’s the eternal bridesmaid. Everyone’s best mate. Despite facing some serious challenges over the years, she’s built a successful ice-cream business and cafe, she’s adored by her family and is an integral part of her hometown – there’s just one thing missing from her life. But the last thing Tab wants is a man – or worse, love – to stop her achieving her dream.

In town for a temporary teaching contract, Fergus McWilliams thinks the small community of Walsh will be the perfect place to stay under the radar but he couldn’t be more wrong. Suddenly, the kids’ cricket team coached by Ferg is inundated with female supporters – single female supporters – and that’s only the beginning.

The only woman who doesn’t seem to have her sights set on Ferg is Tabitha. Despite a disastrous first meeting and a visit from a past love, circumstances keep throwing them together. Neither can deny the sparks between them, but can friendship even be possible for these two strong-willed people?

A moving story of overcoming obstacles and learning to love, from ABIA award-winning author Rachael Johns.

Waiting On: Up On Horsehoe Hill by Penelope Janu

 

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly event hosted at Breaking the Spine. The purpose is to spotlight upcoming releases that we are excited for.

Alongside Queen of Nothing by Holly Black, Up On The Horsehoe Hill by Penelope Janu is tied for my most anticipated release of the second half of 2019. I was fortunate enough to get an e-arc from NetGalley for this one already, but I can’t wait to get my hands on a physical copy the day it releases!

Published by: Harlequin Australia

Expected Publication: 18th November 2019

A kiss can change your life …

Jemima Kincaid loves her home, her horses and her job as a farrier. Life has not been kind to her, but Jemima is happy in the close-knit rural community of Horseshoe Hill, which rallied around in her hour of need. Even so, she is fiercely independent and will never rely on anyone again.

Particularly a man like Finn Blackwood.

An infuriatingly attractive geneticist and wild animal vet, Finn threatens not only the serenity of Jemima’s present, but that of the future she has so carefully mapped out. But as their paths continue to cross, she finds her attraction to Finn impossible to counter, even as the trauma of her past threatens to undo her. Finn is fascinated by Jemima’s solitary nature and unique vulnerabilities but Jemima knows all about loss and how to avoid it. Don’t let anyone get close in the first place …

As the past begins to cast long shadows, Jemima and Finn discover that a kiss can bring worlds together-or tear them apart. Will they finally face their fears and find love on Horseshoe Hill?

Long Lost Review: His Brand of Beautiful by Lily Malone

Long lost Reviews (LLR) is a  monthly feature hosted by Ally @ Ally’s Appraisals where bloggers are encouraged to tackle their review backlog with book reviews that have been sitting there for a long time. Reviews can range from in-depth analyses to one sentence statements with no pressure applied. To learn more and see participating blogs visit Ally’s blog here.

Published:  1st March 2013

Publisher: Escape Publishing, Harlequin Australia’s Digital first imprint

Format: ebook

RRP: $4.99

3/5 Stars

When marketing strategist Tate Newell first meets wine executive Christina Clay, he has one goal in mind: tell Christina he won’t design the new brand for Clay Wines. Tell her thanks, but no thanks. So long, good night. But Tate is a sucker for a damsel in distress and when a diary mix–up leaves Christina in his debt, Tate gets more than he bargained for. What does a resourceful girl do when the best marketing brain in the business won’t play ball? She bluffs. She cheats. And she ups the ante. But when the stakes get too high, does anybody win? Falling in love was never part of this branding brief.

His Brand of Beautiful is a beautiful and sweeping debut by Australian author Lily Malone.

This book is the perfect introduction to the amazing back catalogue that Malone has crafted since the release of His Brand of Beautiful in 2013. Although telling as her debut, compared to later books, this book has all the early trademarks of her writing style; her unique voice, brilliant characters and romantic, somewhat isolated outback settings.

Continue reading

Waiting On Wednesday: The Cinema At Starlight Creek by Alli Sinclair

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly event hosted at Breaking the Spine. The purpose is to spotlight upcoming releases that we are excited for.

 

Published by: Harlequin Australia

Expected Publication: 20th May 2019

 

A heart-stirring novel of loss, love and new hope set against the glamorous backdrop of 1950s Hollywood and a small Australian country town.

How far would you go to follow your dream?

Queensland, 1994: When location manager Claire Montgomery arrives in rural Queensland to work on a TV mini-series, she’s captivated by the beauty of Starlight Creek and the surrounding sugarcane fields. Working in a male-dominated industry is challenging, but Claire has never let that stop her pursuing her dreams-until now. She must gain permission to film at Australia’s most historically significant art deco cinema, located at Starlight Creek. But there is trouble ahead. The community is fractured and the cinema’s reclusive owner, Hattie Fitzpatrick, and her enigmatic great nephew, Luke Jackson, stand in her way, putting Claire’s career-launching project-and her heart-at risk.

Hollywood, 1950: Lena Lee has struggled to find the break that will catapult her into a star with influence. She longs for roles about strong, independent women but with Hollywood engulfed in politics and a censorship battle, Lena’s timing is wrong. Forced to keep her love affair with actor Reeves Garrity a secret, Lena puts her career on the line to fight for equality for women in an industry ruled by men. Her generous and caring nature steers her onto a treacherous path, leaving Lena questioning what she is willing to endure to get what she desires.

Can two women-decades apart-uncover lies and secrets to live the life they’ve dared to dream?

LLR REVIEW: Four Weeks, Five People by Jennifer Yu

Long lost Reviews (LLR) is a  monthly featured hosted by Ally @ Ally’s Appraisals where bloggers are encouraged to tackle their review backlog with book reviews that have been sitting there for a long time. Reviews can range from in-depth analyses to one sentence statements with no pressure applied. To learn more and see participating blogs visit Ally’s blog here.

 

 

Published: 2nd May 2017

Publisher: Harlequin Teen

Pages: 348

Format: Paperback courtesy of the publisher

RRP: $19.99

3/5 Stars

They’re more than their problems

Obsessive-compulsive teen Clarissa wants to get better, if only so her mother will stop asking her if she’s okay.

Andrew wants to overcome his eating disorder so he can get back to his band and their dreams of becoming famous.

Film aficionado Ben would rather live in the movies than in reality.

Gorgeous and overly confident Mason thinks everyone is an idiot.

And Stella just doesn’t want to be back for her second summer of wilderness therapy.

As the five teens get to know one another and work to overcome the various disorders that have affected their lives, they find themselves forming bonds they never thought they would, discovering new truths about themselves and actually looking forward to the future.

It’s been a long time since I read this book, but I stumbled across this half written review with notes and thought it would be perfect for this month’s Long Lost Review. So here goes:

Back in 2017 I received an ARC of Four Weeks, Five People by Jennifer Yu and devoured over the course of two days while floating down the Murray River. The book fascinated me, but while I really enjoyed the novel and what it represented, I can’t help but feel like I wanted more from it at the time. It’s possible that I went in with too high expectations after reading the blurb … but It left me wanting more… in a good way, and a bad way …

Four Weeks, Five People is a compelling and utterly mesmerising young adult novel about a group of five teens who are unwillingly paired up together at Camp Ugunduzi (Swahili for discovery) for the summer. All five kids – Clarissa, Andrew, Ben, Mason and Stella have a different mental illnesses and issues that they need to learn to overcome and live with, but they are also teenagers who are looking for more out of life than group therapy sessions with a bunch of strangers dissecting every aspect of their lives. What ensures then, is essentially a mix of the summer camp narrative vibe of rule breaking, first loves, and self discovery and acceptance, mixed in with a heady does of mental instability and confusion. It really was the perfect novel … until it wasn’t.

This novel is ground breaking as far as I can remember it, for Jennifer Yu was one of the first young adult authors I was aware of who was brave enough to tackle various types of mental illnesses in not only the one book, but with the young adult category, She took to the masses messages of acceptance and tolerance, and held a mirror up to the readers face asking them both what they would do in that situation and who they are at the core.

I want to praise Jennifer Yu for the way she realistically represented the five very different people, their complications and personalities within the camp setting. With five alternate point of views, the novel could have easily ascended into chaos early on, but Yu did a marvellous job crafting and pacing the narrative so that it not only flowed, but you wanted more.

The characters all felt real, authentic people that you and I could have easily passed at school or been at camp with. Their problems were larger than life, and shaped who they were at the core. So much so that Ben’s chapters are even written in script format. Something that is not easy to do, but fits within the context of the novel just as easy as the delivery and voice of any of the other characters.

As a reader, it didn’t take long for me to become emotional invested in the story, so much so that I was left in tears for parts of the narrative. That said, I feel like the last third of this novel was incredibly rushed  and character development was lost in the process here because of it. I wanted more, no, I NEEDED more from the characters especially at the end. Don’t get me wrong, I think one of the crowning achievements of this novel is the way Yu has gone to great lengths to stress that not everyone can be ‘fixed’ in four weeks (or at all, and there is nothing wrong with that), and it’s unrealistic to expect them to come home all rosy, new and ready to take on the world. I loved that. Truly, loved it. BUT when the writing became rushed, characters took a backseat and things got lost, that left me wanting more from Yu as a writer.

I’m not going to spoil this book, as I do believe it has a worthy place in the YA category and it needs to be read, but I do want to give a warning that this book will trigger  a lot of different things for readers. It deals with self harm physically, emotionally and mentally and it’s not a story to be entered into lightly.

 

To learn more about Jennifer Yu, visit the following social media sites:

 Twitter | Goodreads

 

To purchase a copy of Four Weeks, Five People, visit the following online retailers:

Amazon AUS | Amazon US | Barnes & NobleBooktopia | Book Depository | Dymocks |

 

 

COVER REVEAL: The Cinema At Starlight Creek by Alli Sinclair


Available: 20 May, 2019

A heart-stirring novel of loss, love and new hope set against the glamorous backdrop of 1950s Hollywood and a small Australian country town.

How far would you go to follow your dream?

Queensland, 1994: When location manager Claire Montgomery arrives in rural Queensland to work on a TV mini-series, she’s captivated by the beauty of Starlight Creek and the surrounding sugarcane fields. Working in a male-dominated industry is challenging, but Claire has never let that stop her pursuing her dreams-until now. She must gain permission to film at Australia’s most historically significant art deco cinema, located at Starlight Creek. But there is trouble ahead. The community is fractured and the cinema’s reclusive owner, Hattie Fitzpatrick, and her enigmatic great nephew, Luke Jackson, stand in her way, putting Claire’s career-launching project-and her heart-at risk.

Hollywood, 1950: Lena Lee has struggled to find the break that will catapult her into a star with influence. She longs for roles about strong, independent women but with Hollywood engulfed in politics and a censorship battle, Lena’s timing is wrong. Forced to keep her love affair with actor Reeves Garrity a secret, Lena puts her career on the line to fight for equality for women in an industry ruled by men. Her generous and caring nature steers her onto a treacherous path, leaving Lena questioning what she is willing to endure to get what she desires.

Can two women-decades apart-uncover lies and secrets to live the life they’ve dared to dream?

Pre-order available at the following online retailers:

Harper Collins Australia | Amazon AUS | Apple Ibooks | Booktopia | Kobo | Google Play

Alli’s Bio:

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Alli Sinclair, an adventurer at heart, has won multiple awards for her writing. She has lived in Argentina, Peru and Canada, and has climbed some of the world’s highest mountains, worked as a tour guide in South and Central America and has travelled the globe. She enjoys immersing herself in exotic destinations, cultures and languages but Australia has always been close to Alli’s heart.

Alli hosts retreats for Writers at Sea and presents writing workshops around Australia, as well as working on international film projects. She’s a volunteer role model with Books in Homes and is an ambassador for the Fiji Book Drive. Alli’s books explore history, culture, love and grief, and relationships between family, friends and lovers. She captures the romance and thrill of discovering old and new worlds, and loves taking readers on a journey of discovery. 

You can  sign up for her newsletter here.

To learn more about Alli Sinclair, visit the follow social media sites:

Facebook | Author Website | Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads | Google +

12 Days Of Christmas Giveaway Extravaganza: Day 2 – The Woman In A Green Dress by Tea Cooper (SIGNED)

This year I’m running a crazy 12 Days of Christmas Giveaway Extravaganza whereby I giveaway a different book to one lucky winner for 12 days in the lead up to Christmas (and on the 26,27 and 28th December due to a slight delay at the start of the promotion).

Today’s book to be won as part of the 12 Days of Christmas Giveaway Extravaganza is THE WOMAN IN THE GREEN DRESS by Australian author Tea Cooper. Continue reading

Waiting On Wednesday: The Woman In The Green Dress by Tea Cooper

Weekly Meme hosted by Jill @ Breaking The Spine

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly event hosted at Breaking the Spine. The purpose is to spotlight upcoming releases that we are excited for.

Published by: Harlequin Australia

Expected Publication: 17th December 2018

1853 Mogo Creek, NSW

Della Atterton, bereft at the loss of her parents, is holed up in the place she loves best: the beautiful Hawkesbury in New South Wales. Happiest following the trade her father taught her, taxidermy, Della has no wish to return to Sydney. But the unexpected arrival of Captain Stefan von Richter on a quest to retrieve what could be Australia’s first opal, precipitates Della’s return to Sydney and her Curio Shop of Wonders, where she discovers her enigmatic aunt, Cordelia, is selling more than curiosities to collectors. Strange things are afoot and Della, a fly in a spider’s web, is caught up in events with unimaginable consequences…

1919 Sydney, NSW

When London teashop waitress Fleur Richards inherits land and wealth in Australia from her husband, Hugh, killed in the war, she wants nothing to do with it. After all, accepting it will mean Hugh really is dead. But Hugh’s lawyer is insistent, and so she finds herself ensconced in the Berkeley Hotel on Bent St, Sydney, the reluctant owner of a Hawkesbury property and an old curio shop, now desolate and boarded up.

As the real story of her inheritance unravels, Fleur finds herself in the company of a damaged returned soldier Kip, holding a thread that takes her deep into the past, a thread that could unravel a mystery surrounding an opal and a woman in a green dress; a green that is the colour of envy, the colour buried deep within an opal, the colour of poison…

REVIEW: In At The Deep End by Penelope Janu

Published: 23rd January 2017

Publisher: Harlequin Mira

Pages: 348

Format: Print, soft cover courtesy of the publisher

RRP: $29.99 (print)/ $9.99 (Ebook)

5/5 Stars

A quick-witted, contemporary romance about losing your cool.

What woman doesn’t love a real-life hero? Harriet Scott, for one. The fiercely independent daughter of famous adventurers, she grew up travelling the world on the environmental flagship The Watch. So when Harriet’s ship sinks in Antarctica and she has to be rescued by Commander Per Amundsen, an infuriatingly capable Norwegian naval officer and living breathing action hero, her world is turned upside down.

Like their namesakes, the original Scott and Amundsen who competed to reach the South Pole first, Per and Harriet have different ways of doing things. Per thinks Harriet is an accident waiting to happen; Harriet thinks Per is a control freak. But when Harriet realises that Per is the only one who can help her fund the new ship she desperately wants, she is forced to cooperate with him.

Per refuses to assist unless Harriet allows him to teach her to swim. But there is more to Harriet’s terrible fear of water than meets the eye. Can Harriet face her fears and come to terms with the trauma and loss of her past? And will she begin to appreciate that some risks are well worth taking—and that polar opposites can, in fact, attract?

In the interest of full disclosure, I read this book way back in 2017, but it has taken me this long to get my thoughts straight and countless edits and rewrites of this review, before I was happy to post it. When I write a review, I have this unrealistic expectation that the review will reflect and represent everything the book meant to me… when it comes to this book however, words failed me big time. They still do, that is the kind of power it has on me, even now when almost twelve months has past since I initially read it.

In At The Deep End was a book I initially dismissed. There was something about the cover that kept turning me away from the book when it kept appearing in pre-release emails. It wasn’t until a publicist reached out to me and told me I’d like the book and did I want a review copy, that I gave in and gave it a chance… little did I know then how much this book would change me, the power it would hold over me, and that I would eventually end up owning a copy purchased in every available format, while also forcing it on to friends and family at every chance I was given.

Billed as a rom-com, I expected to laugh while reading In At The Deep End; what I didn’t expect however was to cry. And not a couple of tears either; I’m talking about the full on sobbing, red-rimmed eyes, bubbling mess ugly tears kind of crying. My heart was hurting for everything that these characters went through and continued to go through. I didn’t know at times if I want to reach through the pages and hug them or strangle them for the decisions they were making. I wanted, still want too, to cocoon them from everything , and if that’s not a mark of a brilliant book by a masterfully story teller, I really don’t know what is.

In At The Deep End is an outstanding debut novel by Australian author Penelope Janu. Set in both Sydney and the Antarctic, it’s a story about the environment, family and exactly how far we are willing to go to protect the ones we love the most. It’s incredibly well researched, inspiring and uplifting, and one of the most well written and masterfully told stories that I read in 2017 hands down. The characters and the feelings they evoked in me, still linger today at the end of 2018.

As far as the story goes, I’m not going to tell you much, or really anything about this book except to say that it’s an epic slow burn romance that is sure to capture your heart and make you swoon. It’s the perfect read for fans of the enemies-to-lovers trope and just anyone who likes a compelling, intelligent and well written narrative.

Both Harriet and Per are super strong characters, who are both extremely stubborn and steadfast and were always destined to clash in a dramatic way. Fueled by emotions, historical backgrounds and environmental interests, the two characters have a magnetic connection that transcends the words on the page; all of which gives this already powerful story an extra level of depth and intellectual acclaim that is second to none in my eyes. What’s more the Antarctica setting and environmental focus, gives In At The Deep End a refreshing and unique feel that I have not witnessed before.  All of which combines to make on hell of hell good read with a phenomenal slow burn romance that literal develops before your eyes.

I think it’s safe to say, that In At The Deep End by Penelope Janu is one of my all time favourite books now. While it re-taught me a valuable lesson of not judging a book by the cover again (we are all guilty of it),  it also set Penelope Janu as one of my most highly anticipated must buy authors. Since reading this book in 2017, Janu has released three more books and I’ve read them all and been on the hunt for each and every one of them on release day. I’ve also re-read In At The Deep End twice more since then.

In At The Deep End is the perfect read to cool you down during these insane summer heat waves, making it a perfect beach read. While the hopeless romantics out there, and souls with massive hearts, will cry a number of tears, you will laugh so much more than you will cry. I truly believe this book is phenomenal and you really need to pick up a copy ASAP.

 

To learn more about Penelope Janu, visit the following social media sites:

Penelope Janu’s website | Facebook | Harlequin Australia | Goodreads |

To purchase a copy of In At The Deep End, visit the following online retailers:

Harlequin Australia | Booktopia | Angus & Robertson’s Bookworld | Amazon AUS | Amazon US | Ibooks | Dymocks | Google Play | Kobo